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January 1919

WAR NEUROSESSOME VIEWS ON DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

Author Affiliations

C. A. M. C., Consultant in Neurology and Psychiatry MONTREAL, CAN.

Arch NeurPsych. 1919;1(1):25-38. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1919.02180010028003
Abstract

One effect of the war on the medical profession has been to greatly enhance the importance of two special lines of work: (1) orthopedic surgery, and (2) neuropsychiatry.

In prewar days, one might say that these specialties were fighting for proper recognition. Now in England and Canada, at least, military orthopedic surgery includes practically everything but lesions of the brain and the viscera of the abdomen and chest, and the great majority of surgical cases in a military hospital at the base are now looked after by the military orthopedic surgeon.

In the realm of internal medicine and not including the definitely insane, the proportion of returned casualties is about equally divided between the neurologist and the internist. This is due to the fact that we are now beginning to appreciate that the mind is a function of the brain, just as digestion is a function of the

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