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March 1922

THE INCIDENCE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF DYSTHYROIDISM AS AN EX-SERVICE DISABILITYWITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE FINDINGS IN DISCHARGED SOLDIERS AND SAILORS, EXAMINED FOR THE BUREAU OF WAR RISK INSURANCE (NOW THE VETERANS' BUREAU), DISTRICT NO. 2

Author Affiliations

Assistant Attendant Neurologist, Broad Street Hospital, and Neuropsychiatrist, Veterans' Bureau, District No. 2; Neuropsychiatrist, Veterans' Bureau, District No. 2 NEW YORK

Arch NeurPsych. 1922;7(3):332-340. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1922.02190090048005
Abstract

The literature of the late World War early recorded a remarkable frequency of hyperthyroid conditions as compared with their incidence in times of peace. This was noted among combatants and non-combatants in military service, and in the civil population as well. Disabled ex-service men and women who had been invalided, and those less severely disabled in service who had been discharged in good condition but who had had a relapse, have together constituted the examinees of the federal Bureau of War Risk Insurance (the Veterans' Bureau since Aug. 9, 1921); here also the incidence of hyperthyroidism has been above normal. H. W. Wright,1 in a review of postbellum neuroses, separates a group of "secondary neurasthenic states," including those complicated by thyrotoxicoses, or those in which some disorder of the thyroid is a prominent feature. It seemed worth while to review the war literature on dysthyroidisms in the light

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