[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
May 1922

MULTIPLE DEGENERATIVE SOFTENING VERSUS MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

Author Affiliations

Associate Professor of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Illinois; Histologist to Illinois State Psychopathic Institute; Attending Neurologist, Cook County Hospital; Professor of Medicine (Nervous and Mental Diseases) Rush Medical College; Attending Neurologist, Presbyterian Hospital CHICAGO

From the pathologic laboratories of the Cook County Hospital and Illinois State Psychopathic Institute.

Arch NeurPsych. 1922;7(5):613-628. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1922.02190110064007
Abstract

Recent histopathologic studies of the central nervous system have brought to light a group of cases presenting peculiar lesions in the form of scattered foci of degeneration. These foci or plaques differ microscopically from the patches of multiple sclerosis, encephalomyelitis and similar conditions and may be the cause of many indefinite clinical syndromes. These probably include many cases described as degenerative encephalitis, disseminated encephalomyelitis, malignant or acute multiple sclerosis, poliencephalitis superior of Wernicke, and other conditions. Generally speaking, they do not conform, either clinically or pathologically, to any established morbid entity.

The histopathologic examination of such a case seems to justify the conclusion that we are here dealing with a disease group sui generis which we propose to designate as multiple degenerative softening in order to emphasize the contrast with multiple sclerosis.

CLINICAL REPORT OF A CASE (DR. BASSOE) 

History.  —A man, aged 28 years, was first in the Presbyterian

×