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July 1922

STATISTICS OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSISINCLUDING A STUDY OF THE INFANTILE, CONGENITAL, FAMILIAL AND HEREDITARY FORMS AND THE MENTAL AND PSYCHIC SYMPTOMS

Author Affiliations

Associate in Neurology, Columbia University; Adjunct Attending Neurologist, the Mt. Sinai Hospital and Associate Visiting Neurologist, the Montefiore Hospital NEW YORK

Arch NeurPsych. 1922;8(1):59-75. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1922.02190130062009
Abstract

This study is based on the records of 1,970 cases of multiple sclerosis. Of the total, 1,773 represent cases culled from literature and 197 those whose records I have personally studied. Of the latter, fifty-five are from the Vanderbilt Clinic, ninety-three from the Mount Sinai Hospital and forty-nine from the Montefiore Hospital.

The object of the investigation was to determine the comparative incidence of the disease in the United States and Europe, the ages (including the ages of onset), average duration, sex, civil status, occupation and nativity. Special study was made of cases reported as hereditary, congenital, familial and infantile. Although the matter of personality (psychic and mental manifestations) does not come within the purview of a statistical study, attention was paid to this aspect of the symptomatology of the disease.

With the exception of a few recent reports in the literature, most of the statistical records date back many

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