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September 1922

A CONSIDERATION OF THE DERMAL VERSUS THE EPIDERMAL CHOLESTEATOMAS HAVING THEIR ATTACHMENT IN THE CEREBRAL ENVELOPES

Author Affiliations

Associate in Neurological Surgery to the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital BOSTON

Arch NeurPsych. 1922;8(3):265-285. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1922.02190150043003
Abstract

In a series of approximately 750 verified brain tumors from the clinic of Dr. Harvey Cushing, there have occurred seven examples of true intracranial cholesteatomas. In 1920, Bailey1 reported two of these, representing the nonhair-containing variety, and since the publication of this article there has been one further example of the same type. The other three tumors have contained hair, and therefore come under the heading of dermoids, or hair-containing cholesteatomas. It is with the latter three cases that this paper proposes to deal.

NOMENCLATURE  A word should be said regarding the terminology used in the description of the tumors under discussion. By the term "intracranial cholesteatomas" is understood the definite but rare class of tumors of the intracranial cavity ordinarily referred to as "cholesteatomas" and qualified as "hair-containing" or as "pearly tumors." Twenty-five years ago Bostroem2 (1897) gave an admirable description of these growths under the caption

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