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November 1922

AN ANALYSIS OF FOURTEEN CONSECUTIVE CASES OF SPINAL CORD TUMOR

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Arch NeurPsych. 1922;8(5):455-501. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1922.02190170002001
Abstract

While tumors of the spinal cord, the spinal roots or meninges are less frequent than tumors of the brain, in the ratio of 1 to 6, the proportion of operable tumors of the cord from the standpoint of localization and facility of removal is greater than that of tumors of the brain. In twelve of the fourteen consecutive cases chosen for review, the tumor was accessible, not difficult of localization, well encapsulated and distinctly an operable lesion. The ratio of spinal tumors to tumors at large is about 1 to 50 (Schlesinger). Perhaps because of their relative infrequency, they are often overlooked; and years may elapse before the true nature of the lesion is recognized. In many instances the pain of which the patient complains is attributed to a lesion in the territory to which the pain is referred. Neuralgia, neuritis, rheumatism if in the neighborhood of a joint, angina

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