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January 1924

A NOTE ON THE COMPARATIVE HISTOPATHOLOGY OF ACUTE ANTERIOR POLIOMYELITIS AND EPIDEMIC ENCEPHALITIS

Author Affiliations

Associate Professor of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Illinois CHICAGO

From the Division of Neurology of the College of Medicine, University of Illinois, and the pathologic laboratories of the Illinois State Psychopathic Institute and Cook County Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1924;11(1):28-42. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1924.02190310034002
Abstract

Epidemic encephalitis and epidemic poliomyelitis are typical instances of acute inflammation of the central nervous system. In both conditions the entire nervous system is more or less involved, the mesencephalon principally in the former, and the spinal cord in the latter. The site of the lesion is thus the main aid in the histopathologic diagnosis of typical cases. In atypical cases, both the mesencephalon and the spinal cord may be involved, and such cases present great difficulties in differential diagnosis. In fact the similarity in localization, gross character and histology may be so great that, as Häuptli1 pointed out, they might be considered as identical processes.

However, it has been shown by clinical, serologic and possibly also bacteriologic studies that they are distinct morbid entities.

My studies of a case of acute anterior poliomyelitis (Landry's type) and of one of epidemic (lethargic) encephalitis have led me to the conclusion

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