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March 1924

ELECTRICALLY EXCITABLE REGION OF THE FOREBRAIN OF THE ALLIGATOR

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Neurological Laboratory of the Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic, Johns Hopkins University.

Arch NeurPsych. 1924;11(3):257-263. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1924.02190330007001
Abstract

The findings of J. B. Johnston, particularly those recorded in his paper, "Evidence of a Motor Pallium in the Forebrain of Reptiles," giving the results of the electrical stimulation of the forebrain of turtles and lizards, suggested twelve experiments on seven alligators varying in length from 21/2 to 5 feet (76 to 152 cm.).

The exposure of the hemisphere of the alligator offers some difficulty because of the dense skull with a thick vascular inner table and ivory-like outer table covered by thin tightly adherent skin. An extensive exposure, however, may be made by dividing the skull in the midline and elevating two lateral bone flaps. These flaps can be returned to their original position and the same animal used for repeated experiments if care is exercised in the manipulation of the brain.

Movements have been recorded by photographs and tracings. In the photographic method a bromid paper was used

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