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June 1924

MORPHOLOGIC CHANGES IN NERVE CELLS FOLLOWING INJURY TO THEIR AXONS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From The Hull Laboratory of Anatomy, The University of Chicago.

Arch NeurPsych. 1924;11(6):680-697. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1924.02190360068006
Abstract

Changes in nerve cell cytoplasm with its correlated axon and dendritic processes, together with changes in the size, shape, position and general character of its various constituents—the Nissl bodies, canalicular apparatus, mitochondria and the nucleus with its contained chromatin material and nucleolus—have been investigated repeatedly in connection with a number of variously induced methods of injury. For the most part, the changes described have been swelling, shrinkage, vacuolation and pigmentation of the cytoplasm; chromatolysis of the Nissl substance; fragmentation and dispersion of the canalicular apparatus; stability of the mitochondria; swelling, shrinkage, distortion, eccentricity, nuclear wall degeneration, vacuolation and increase or decrease in chromatin content of the nucleus; and increase or decrease in the number or size of the paranucleoli and nucleoli. The methods of inducing injury have been, in general, either direct, such as sectioning, tearing or stimulating electrically the axon processes, or indirect, as in inflammations, infections, chemical poisonings

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