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September 1924

STUDIES OF CEREBRAL FUNCTION IN LEARNINGV. THE RETENTION OF MOTOR HABITS AFTER DESTRUCTION OF THE SO-CALLED MOTOR AREAS IN PRIMATES

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS

From the Department of Psychology of the University of Minnesota.

Arch NeurPsych. 1924;12(3):249-276. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1924.02200030002001
Abstract

Since the area was first described by Fritsch and Hitzig,1 the function of the electrostimulable cortex of the cerebrum has been the subject of almost continuous controversy. The experiments were immediately called in question through criticisms of the technic by Dupuy,2 Sanderson,3 Carville and Duret,4 and others, or by abstruse metaphysical deductions such as were advanced by Hermann5 who objected to the motor area as violating the "unity of mind." The work of Ferrier,6 Carville and Duret and Hitzig soon established the fact of the electrical excitability of limited areas of the cortex, but immediately a new question arose. Fritsch and Hitzig had considered the excitable zone as motor, if we may translate the expression, "entry of single psychic functions into material" by such a term. In this they were followed by Carville and Duret, who described the motor disturbances following lesions in the

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