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December 1924

VENTRICULAR HEMORRHAGE WITH RECOVERYREPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Philadelphia Orthopedic Hospital and Infirmary for Nervous Diseases, service of Dr. T. H. Weisenburg.

Arch NeurPsych. 1924;12(6):695-700. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1924.02200060096007
Abstract

Hemorrhage into the ventricles of the brain, while usually conceded to be fatal, need not necessarily result in death, as is shown by the case which is reported in this paper. Most writers agree that primary hemorrhage into the cerebral ventricles is both rare and fatal, and indeed that hemorrhage into the cerebral ventricles, whether primary or secondary, is always fatal. Among those who hold this view are Oppenheim,1 Osler,2 Church and Peterson,3 Jones4 and Hughlings Jackson.5 Oppenheim1 is of the opinion that in both primary and secondary hemorrhage "death almost inevitably occurs—indeed within the first twentyfour hours." Osier2 states that hemorrhages which rupture into the ventricles "rapidly prove fatal," and Church and Peterson3 state that "indications of ventricular flooding practically mean death." Jones4 analyzed fifty-five cases of ventricular hemorrhage, and concluded that 60 per cent, of the patients die during

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