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July 1925

SEQUELAE OF EPIDEMIC ENCEPHALITIS WITHOUT ANY PRECEDING ACUTE ILLNESS (CHRONIC ENCEPHALITIS)REPORT OF CASES

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Arch NeurPsych. 1925;14(1):20-24. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1925.02200130023003
Abstract

The determination of the cause of acute brain disease, especially when the patient is first seen weeks or months after the onset, has become more difficult since the reappearance of epidemic encephalitis in 1917, because, seemingly, new and certainly unfamiliar, clinical pictures are frequently presented to us. During the epidemic, once the disease became known, the diagnosis was, or seemed to be, easy; given a patient ill for a few days with fever, transitory diplopia, much or little headache and somnolence, and the diagnosis was made. Soon it was noted that in many patients instead of somnolence there was delirium, or the clock was turned round, and the patient slept all day and was delirious all night. After a time, it was learned that there were characteristic sequelae appearing at varying times after the acute attack. Finally, and I think it is the last complicating factor in the study of

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