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April 1926

DELAYED POST-TRAUMATIC INTRACRANIAL COMPRESSION

Arch NeurPsych. 1926;15(4):475-479. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1926.02200220086005

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Abstract

In neurologic surgery it is well known that craniocerebral injuries are often followed immediately by more or less pronounced conditions of increased intracranial pressure. It does not seem to be so well known that conditions of increased intracranial pressure causing alarming symptoms and requiring active therapeutic measures may make their appearance suddenly as a late phenomenon following craniocerebral injury, which need not be extensive, is often of negligible consequence, and occasionally passes unrecognized. Such a case recently came under my observation.

REPORT OF A CASE 

History.  —The patient was a strong, active and robust man. Up to the time when he received his injuries, he was in the best of health, and there were no signs or symptoms of any disturbance or illness.About six weeks before admission to Mount Sinai Hospital, the patient was involved in an automobile accident, during which he was thrown from the car and landed

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