[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
May 1926

SENSORY DISTURBANCES IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSISTHEIR SIGNIFICANCE IN DIAGNOSIS

Author Affiliations

PRAGUE, CZECHOSLOVAKIA

From the Psychiatric Clinic of the German University of Prague.

Arch NeurPsych. 1926;15(5):537-544. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1926.02200230002001

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

It has long been known that sensory disturbances are of frequent occurrence in multiple sclerosis. The honor of having first called attention to this fact belongs to Oppenheim and C. S. Freund. Nevertheless, the fact does not seem to have become generally known among physicians, and it is still frequently stated that absence of sensory disturbances is characteristic in multiple sclerosis. This contradiction is explained by the fact that, as a rule, severe, persistent disturbances of sensibility, such as occur, for example, in transverse myelitis, are absent. But transient, fugitive paresthesias are very frequent, and there are few cases in which, if careful inquiry is made, the patient will not report them.

I have previously called attention to the significance of sensory disturbances in multiple sclerosis, and the more closely I have studied my patients, the more frequently I have found such disturbances. The clinical diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is

×