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April 1927

PROTEIN SENSITIZATION IN EPILEPSYA STUDY OF ONE THOUSAND CASES AND ONE HUNDRED NORMAL CONTROLS

Author Affiliations

Consulting Physician and Resident Pathologist, Respectively, Craig Colony SONYEA, N. Y.

Arch NeurPsych. 1927;17(4):427-443. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1927.02200340003001
Abstract

Recently, much interest has centered in protein sensitization. This phenomenon, not yet fully understood, has been designated variously as "protein sensitization," "hypersensibility," "allergy" and "anaphylaxis." It has been invoked as a causative factor in a wide range of disease conditions of perplexing etiology, such as hay-fever, asthma, eczema and urticaria. One of the most recent conditions to be added to this constantly increasing group is epilepsy. We have considered the history of protein sensitization and the general bearing of the question of protein hypersensibility on convulsive disorders in a previous paper,1 as part of a preliminary report on this subject.

REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE  The development of the knowledge of protein sensitization, like much else that serum study has revealed during the last twenty-five years, takes root in isolated observations scattered through the early literature, but often regarded as merely noteworthy accidents or technical errors. The cutaneous reaction obtained

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