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March 1928

TUMORS OF THE POSTERIOR CRANIAL FOSSAHOMOLATERAL AND CONTRALATERAL PYRAMIDAL TRACT SIGNS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Neurological Divisions, and the Surgical Service (Dr. Elsberg) of the New York Neurological Institute.

Arch NeurPsych. 1928;19(3):509-514. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1928.02210090135010

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Abstract

In unilateral expanding lesions above the tentorium, increase in the tendon reflexes is usually greater on the side of the body opposite to that of the lesion; this is readily explained.

In infratentorial new growths, there are many variations in the tendon reflexes on the two sides; in some instances, the reflexes are unchanged; in others, all tendon reflexes are diminished; in some patients, there is a bilateral and equal increase; in others, there is a homolateral or contralateral hyperreflexia. No special studies of the disturbances of the pyramidal tract and few statements concerning the possible significance of the alterations in the tendon reflexes in new growths limited entirely or mainly to one side of the posterior cranial fossa are to be found in the literature.

The records of about 150 patients with subtentorial expanding lesions have been reviewed, but the histories in only fifty cases have been used for

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