[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
July 1928

COMPRESSION OF THE SPINAL CORD IN HODGKIN'S DISEASEA CASE OF THIRTEEN YEARS' DURATION WITH RECESSION OF SYMPTOMS FOLLOWING ROENTGEN-RAY THERAPY

Arch NeurPsych. 1928;20(1):130-137. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1928.02210130133007
Abstract

Compression of the spinal cord, with its resulting spastic paraplegia and level localizing sensory symptoms, of rather gradual onset, is so frequently due to tumor that other possible causative factors have received little consideration. Compression due to disease of the vertebrae is not uncommon and that due to localized disease of the meninges is known but rather rare. Still more rare is compression from disease of the epidural tissues such as has been known to occur in the lymphoplasias of the epidural lymphoid tissues in Hodgkin's disease.

Hodgkin's disease has aroused interest in many fields of medicine since it was first described by Thomas Hodgkin1 in 1832. Clinicians and pathologists continue to discuss its etiology, and much has frequently been written in which the disease was regarded as infectious in origin. There is a remittent febrile reaction accompanied by general weakness, loss of weight, cachexia and lethargy. Associated with

×