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July 1928

THE ELECTIVITY OF DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the University of Chicago Department of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1928;20(1):145-154. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1928.02210130148009
Abstract

Bacteriology has demonstrated that the specific nature of a tissue, when attacked by a morbific agent is of great importance in determining the evolution of the disease process. The conditions that influence the development of a disease include not only those of the individual constitution, but probably also certain superindividual peculiarities such as sex or race. Furthermore, it is evident that morbific agents have distinct affinities also for certain organ systems, and even parts of these systems, within an individual, a fact to be taken as the foundation of a symptomatically well-defined disease.

In attempting to explain these relations with the knowledge at present available,it must be recalled that the conception even of the individual constitution is not of absolute value. On the contrary, this constitution is an expression of varied and variable individual behavior toward the various surrounding influences. Hence investigations directed toward interpretation of the tendency of organs

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