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September 1928

CHANGES IN THE BRAIN IN PYEMIA AND IN SEPTICEMIA

Author Affiliations

Assistant Professor of Neurology, University of Illinois College of Medicine CHICAGO

From the Division of Neuropathology (Dr. Hassin) of the pathology laboratories of the Research and Educational Hospitals of the University of Illinois and the State Psychopathic Institute.

Arch NeurPsych. 1928;20(3):524-536. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1928.02210150084005
Abstract

The central nervous system is frequently affected in pyemia and in septicemia. Since these morbid conditions have been studied mainly clinically, a study of the pathologic changes in the central nervous system in these diseases may prove of interest. With this in view, two cases were studied: one of acute hematogenous infection (Staphylococcus pyogenes-aureus) and another of unknown etiology.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.—History.  —A white girl, aged 8, admitted to Cook County Hospital (Dr. McNally's service) on March 30, 1925, complained of pain and swelling of the right ankle of about one week's duration. There was no history of any previous illness.

Examination.  —The patient was poorly nourished and appeared desperately ill. The temperature was 103 F., the pulse rate 140 and the respiration rate 30. The scalp was normal. The pupils were regular and reacted normally to light and in accommodation. The scleras were slightly jaundiced, and the

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