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September 1928

REPORT OF A CASE OF PERIODIC SOMNOLENCE WITH MAJOR OPERATION UNDER HYPNOSIS

Author Affiliations

Chicago Assistant Neurologist, St. Lukes Hospital, Chicago; Assistant in Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Illinois

From the Neurological Service of St. Lukes Hospital, Chicago.

Arch NeurPsych. 1928;20(3):595-602. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1928.02210150155011
Abstract

The differential diagnosis of periodic somnolence is still difficult, in spite of recent advances in the study of epidemic encephalitis, tumor of the brain, pituitary disturbances, narcolepsy and hysteria. Hypnosis may be a valuable aid in the study of these cases.

REPORT OF A CASE 

Clinical History.  —M, M., aged 23, an even tempered, pleasant woman was admitted to the neurologic service of Dr. George W. Hall, St. Lukes Hospital, on Dec. 23, 1926, with a complaint of "sleeping spells." The patient dated the onset from an attack of what probably was an acute left peripheral facial paralysis (the left eye could not be closed, the right side of the face was drawn up and the sense of taste was impaired) which occurred in October, 1920, and persisted for three months, leaving as a sequel occasional ticlike movements and shooting pains of the left side of the face. The first

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