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March 1929

THE NEUROLOGIC ASPECTS OF INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Neurological Department of the Bellevue Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1929;21(3):571-582. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1929.02210210097005
Abstract

My purpose is to review the condition commonly spoken of as intermittent claudication and to point out features which are of particular neurologic interest. The term intermittent claudication, as Buerger1 said, should be rejected as descriptive of a disease and should be restricted to a combination of associated symptoms observable in a number of different pathologic processes.

Intermittent claudication may be a symptom of any form of arterial disease, though usually it is due either to arteritis obliterans or to arteriosclerosis of all or a portion of a peripheral tree. Buerger quoted Bing2 as finding it impossible to differentiate between the intermittent claudication of endarteritis obliterans and that of arteriosclerosis. However, there is a contrast which is usually maintained. With arteritis obliterans, gross trophic changes, frequently gangrene, occur. In the conditions due to arteriosclerosis gangrene is extremely rare. My experience has been with intermittent claudication as a symptom

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