[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
March 1929

THE BROMIDE TREATMENT FOR EPILEPSY IN THE DISPENSARY

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1929;21(3):664-676. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1929.02210210190015
Abstract

The most widely accepted treatment for epilepsy in this country is the control of the convulsions by phenobarbital, which checks the attacks well; but with sudden cessations the convulsions recur immediately; status epilepticus may follow, and not infrequently death occurs. I have seen this in several patients who had taken phenobarbital irregularly. It is therefore desirable to discuss the conditions under which other remedies, such as bromide, may still be used.

Bromide was introduced by Locock (1853). Through Brown-Séquard and Voisin, it attained the dominant position in the treatment for epilepsy. With the treatment the attacks (grand mal, petit mal and migraine) were suppressed, and a transition from the epileptic character to the normal was induced. Bromide was administered in high doses (from 15 to 20 Gm.) and rather blindly, as the actual facts of its influence were unknown. On the suggestion of the physiologist Richet, Toulouse gave a salt-free

×