[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
May 1929

TUMORS OF THE BRAIN WITH ACUTE ONSET AND RAPIDLY PROGRESSIVE COURSE"ACUTE BRAIN TUMOR"

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Neurological and Surgical Services and the Laboratories of Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1929;21(5):1044-1078. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1929.02210230058004
Abstract

The symptoms of intracranial tumor may appear suddenly and may advance rapidly, due either to bleeding into a growth, to the precipitate occurrence of obstructive hydrocephalus, swelling or edema, or to interference with the blood supply of a part of the brain. The onset of symptoms may be sudden as the result of hemorrhage into a tumor in a relatively "silent" area of the brain. Acute dilatation of the ventricular system is not rare when a growth, especially one in the posterior cranial fossa, begins to cause pressure on some part of the ventricular channels. "Swelling" of the brain may come on quickly in infiltrating tumors. Growths, especially those situated in or near a temporal lobe, not infrequently interfere with the circulation of blood in a middle cerebral artery or one of its main branches, the result of which is a large area of encephalomalacia with the sudden appearance of

×