[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
September 1929

EPIDEMIC ENCEPHALITIS WITH CEREBELLAR SYMPTOMSA CLINICAL STUDY OF TWO CASES

Author Affiliations

Commonwealth Fellow in Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania PHILADELPHIA

Arch NeurPsych. 1929;22(3):469-474. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1929.02220030046004
Abstract

Although numerous cases of epidemic encephalitis with involvement of the vestibular connections have been reported in the literature, a predominance of cerebellar symptomatology is less frequently found. When cerebellar manifestations have been described they have, in ḿost cases, been overshadowed by the parkinsonian syndrome.

REPORT OF CASES  In view of the comparatively rare incidence of cerebellar symptomatology in chronic epidemic encephalitis, the following cases are presented.

Case 1.—History.  —B. B., a high school student, aged 18, was admitted to the University Hospital on April 25, 1928, complaining of headache, dizziness and staggering. The symptoms had begun one year previously when he noticed blurred vision and diplopia on continued reading. This difficulty increased in severity during the next few weeks. There were no chills or fever, but a dull pain between the shoulders and a persistent headache were present and at times became agonizing. Seven months after the appearance of diplopia,

×