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October 1929

THE CEREBRAL CIRCULATIONXI b. THE ACTION OF THE EXTRACT OF THE POSTERIOR LOBE OF THE PITUITARY GLAND

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Department of Neuropathology, Harvard Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1929;22(4):691-694. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1929.02220040046004
Abstract

Different investigators seem to have obtained different results from the intravenous injection and local application of solution of pituitary, U. S. P. Dixon and Halliburton,1 in brain perfusion experiments on dogs, found that pituitary at first constricted and then dilated cerebral arteries. Cow,2 using rings or sections of surviving cerebral arteries of various animals, found that pituitary caused constriction. Raphael and Stanton3 measured the changes in the volume of the brain and the pulse through a defect in the skull in man. They concluded that pituitary given intravenously caused cerebral dilatation. Florey4 directly observed the cerebral surface (both the convexity and the base) of cats, and observed no change in the size of the cerebral arteries on either intravenous injection or local application of pituitary. Sandor,5 on studing cerebral blood vessels in the frog by direct microscopic observation, found that pituitary caused constriction which was followed by dilatation. Howe and McKinley6 noted no change in cerebral arteries in cats after the intravenous injection of pituitary extract.

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