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November 1929

THE HISTOLOGY OF NEUROGLIAL CHANGES FOLLOWING- CEREBRAL TRAUMAAN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION

Author Affiliations

TORONTO, CANADA

From the Anatomy Department, University of Toronto.

Arch NeurPsych. 1929;22(5):926-948. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1929.02220050064005
Abstract

Knowledge of the histology of the elements which go to form the connective tissue of the nervous system has been advanced in recent years principally owing to the labors of Ramon y Cajal and his followers in the institute of his name at Madrid.

By the perfection of various histologic methods of impregnation of nerve tissue by gold and silver salts it is now possible to distinguish four different types of cells which make up the neuroglial or supporting tissue of the nervous system. Macroglia is the term applied to two of these types, which are large cells having processes radiating from a central cell body. On account of their general form the macroglia cells are now known as astrocytes, and the two types vary principally in the presence or absence of fibrils in their protoplasm, thence arising the terms fibrillary and protoplasmic astrocytes.

The remaining two types of connective

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