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February 1930

MYELORADICULITISA CLINICAL SYNDROME, WITH REPORT OF SEVEN CASES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Neurologic Service, Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1930;23(2):240-256. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1930.02220080024003
Abstract

We recently observed a series of patients of unusual interest. They uniformly presented rapid development of motor and sensory signs with kaleidoscopic improvement or recovery. There was involvement of the motor and sensory components, at times in the nerve roots, at other times in the spinal cord substance, and in some of the cases in both the nerve roots and the cord. The similarity between all these cases led us to the opinion that there is a common etiologic agent. That this may be an infectious agent is probable, for in almost all of the cases the patients gave a history of a preceding inflammation of the upper respiratory tract. Ordinarily, each case taken by itself could have and probably would have been designated as an infective myelitis, and individually would perhaps have created no special interest. None of the cases can properly be labeled as purely neuritic. The rapidity

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