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March 1930

CORTICAL ANOMALIES, VENTRICULAR HETEROTOPIAS AND OCCLUSION OF THE AQUEDUCT OF SYLVIUS

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Section on Pathologic Anatomy, the Mayo Clinic.

Arch NeurPsych. 1930;23(3):460-480. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1930.02220090051002
Abstract

True heterotopia of the brain is not common, although a considerable number of cases is reported in the German literature, but few in French, English or American literature. Heterotopias vary much in size, site and number, and when present they usually are multiple. Tüngel1 found heterotopias of gray substance in the wall of the lateral ventricle, whereas Meschede2 found as many as eighty heterotopic nodules in the walls of the lateral ventricles. Virchow3 described heterotopic nodules in a brain, saying that they appeared as if a gyrus was placed in the white substance. Ermann4 found about thirty such nodules and Hoffmann5 saw ganglion cells, with fatty degeneration, in some heterotopic islands. Otto6 had three cases with nodules in the ventricular walls, whereas Wicke7 described a case of heterotopia in the centrum semiovale. Matell8 described a case of massive heterotopia underneath the cortex

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