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July 1930

SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE AS A CLINICAL COMPLICATION OF NEUROSYPHILIS

Author Affiliations

Associate in Neurology, Columbia University BROOKLYN

Arch NeurPsych. 1930;24(1):85-93. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1930.02220130088008
Abstract

The recognition of the various forms of neurosyphilis has, during recent years, become relatively easy. This is due to a better understanding of the underlying pathologic process as well as to the standardization of the Wassermann test and the addition of the Kahn test. A thorough neurologic examination as well as a serologic study usually leads to the correct diagnosis. Failure to diagnose neurosyphilis correctly is due to error of omission rather than of commission. The therapy of these disorders has also become more or less standardized. The different arsphenamine preparations, mercury, bismuth, tryparsamide, and malaria inoculation, selected to suit each particular case, comprise a fairly effectual group of remedies in the treatment for these diseases. The following two cases are reported because of their unusual clinical picture, their striking diagnostic difficulties and therapeutic problems, and the interesting pathologic observations in one of them.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.—History.  —A.

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