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September 1930

CHANGES OF THE SPINAL CORD IN HODGKIN'S DISEASEREPORT OF TWO CASES, WITH AN UNUSUAL SKIN MANIFESTATION IN ONE

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Pathology of the Cook County Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1930;24(3):509-524. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1930.02220150072003
Abstract

Hodgkin's disease is noted for its ubiquitous appearances. Wherever lymphatic tissue exists in the body, lymphogranulomatosis may occur. Wherever it appears, it initiates a series of local, and distant, secondary changes. These, partly specific and partly nonspecific, account for a wide variety of clinical syndromes which follow. The variability of the disease is a byword. It assumes all forms and shapes. Several of the more unusual, clinical and pathologic vagaries of Hodgkin's disease were combined in the following cases.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.—Clinical History.  —A colored woman, aged 32, entered the Cook County Hospital insisting that she had always been well until three weeks before. Casually she mentioned that one year before, while in another city, she had had a gradual swelling of the glands of the neck, one of which had been removed for biopsy; a diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease had been made. She had been given an

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