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September 1930

THE BLOOD ELECTROLYTE CHANGES IN NARCOSIS, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO CALCIUM AND POTASSIUMAN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

Associate in Psychiatry BALTIMORE

From the Laboratory of Internal Medicine, Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1930;24(3):525-541. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1930.02220150088004
Abstract

The problem of narcosis is of interest from various standpoints. It interests, besides the surgeon and the anesthetist, the physician, on account of the similarity of the essential pharmacologic properties of narcotic and hypnotic drugs; both induce sleep, although of unequal depth, and, what is more important, of unequal duration. It also attracts the attention of biologists and psychologists who are interested in the problem of sleep.

The main purpose of this paper is to present the results of a study of the behavior of the electrolytic elements in the blood in sleep and in narcosis. The behavior of calcium and potassium during narcosis has been the main object of my investigation, because of the predominant part which, according to some investigators, these elements play in induced and natural sleep. Before recording the results of my investigations, I shall survey some studies that deal with narcosis, mainly on an anatomophysiologic

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