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November 1930

THE MECHANISM OF THE ABDOMINAL AND CRE-MASTERIC REFLEXESCOLLECTIVE REVIEW

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Subdepartment of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University.

Arch NeurPsych. 1930;24(5):1023-1033. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1930.02220170143014
Abstract

This review deals particularly with the anatomy and physiology of the abdominal and cremasteric reflexes. It is difficult to understand why, after injuries to the pyramidal tract, the tendon reflexes become hyperactive while the abdominal and cremasteric reflexes are lost. Attempts have been made to explain the physiology of these reflexes in many ways.

TYPES OF REFLEXES DEMONSTRABLE IN MAN  The reflexes normally elicited in man may be divided into three groups: tendon reflexes, cutaneous reflexes in a normal person and cutaneous reflexes demonstrable only after injury of the nervous system.The mechanism of the tendon reflexes and their abnormalities in disease are fairly well understood owing to the fundamental physiologic investigations of Sherrington and his followers and the interpretations of modern clinical neurologists. The afferent pathway for the reflex consists of the proprioceptive fibers from the muscle itself. The sudden stretch of the muscle produced by tapping the tendon

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