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December 1930

HYDROCEPHALUSSTUDIES OF THE PATHOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS, WITH REMARKS ON THE CEREBROSPINAL FLUID

Author Affiliations

Professor of Neurology, University of Illinois College of Medicine; Histologist to the Illinois State Psychopathic Institute; Attending Neurologist, Cook County Hospital CHICAGO

From the Pathologic Laboratories of the Research and Educational Hospitals, University of Illinois and the State Psychopathic Institute.

Arch NeurPsych. 1930;24(6):1164-1186. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1930.02220180061005
Abstract

Studies of the pathology of hydrocephalus, with few exceptions,1 have pertained to the condition of the ventricles and subarachnoid spaces. In general, they have been anatomic rather than histologic. In this article I shall attempt to describe the most important microscopic central nerve changes in this morbid condition and the conclusions that may be warranted from such observations as to some causes of the excessive accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid in the cerebral cavities and the mode of its absorption. Twelve cases of hydrocephalus have been studied, all of the so-called communicating type. In this, Dandy and Blackfan2 included cases in which the communication between the ventricles remains open, the obstruction taking place in the subarachnoid space. If the ventricular communication is obstructed, by a tumor, for instance, the hydrocephalus is noncommunicating.

METHODS OF STUDY  Blocks from various portions of the brain, including the leptomeninges and the dura, when

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