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March 1931

THE BRAIN AND THE CEREBROSPINAL FLUID IN ACUTE ASEPTIC CEREBRAL EMBOLISMAN EXPERIMENTAL AND PATHOLOGIC STUDY

Author Affiliations

MONTREAL, CANADA

Arch NeurPsych. 1931;25(3):523-547. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1931.02230030081004
Abstract

It would seem that the pathology of cerebral embolism should be a settled subject. This may be true for the late stages of the process. Current textbooks on pathology and contemporary medical literature show, however, that the most acute phases of the process are not widely understood.

The purpose of this report is to point out that the pathologic reaction in the brain as a result of sudden infarction is the same as that which occurs with sudden destruction in other tissues of the body. Polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes infiltrate the involved area quickly. They reach the meninges, and in this early period can frequently be found in the cerebrospinal fluid. They are transient and disappear completely after a relatively short time.

Attention was first attracted to the polymorphonuclear leukocytic reaction, the result of cerebral embolism, in a study focused primarily on the acute degenerative changes which occurred in neuroglia. Interest

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