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May 1931

PAIN PATHWAYS IN THE SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEMCLINICAL EVIDENCE

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Neurological and Circulatory Clinics of the Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.

Arch NeurPsych. 1931;25(5):986-997. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1931.02230050062002
Abstract

The conception that sensory impulses are carried only by the cranial and spinal nerves has been held and taught for many years. Such a conception is hard to disprove. A corollary to this theory is that the sympathetic nervous system carries efferent motor impulses only. It must be admitted that the sympathetic nervous system has received but scant attention from the clinician in the past, and that the investigations of those interested in this system have frequently been passed over or contradicted without proper evidence. We shall present clinical evidence suggesting that sensory impulses may pass over pathways running in or intimately associated with the ganglia of the sympathetic chain and the white rami. Whether or not these pain-bearing pathways are somatic fibers running with the sympathetic nerves is unimportant if they can be interrupted by sympathectomy or the injection of alcohol. It may be that this clinical evidence suggests

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