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July 1932

CEREBRAL CIRCULATIONAFFERENT IMPULSES FROM THE BLOOD VESSELS OF THE PIA

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Psychobiological Laboratory, Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1932;28(1):140-150. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1932.02240010148011
Abstract

Since the cerebral circulation is dominated by the blood vessels of the pia mater, their activity is of major importance to the brain. That these vessels are richly supplied with nerves can no longer be questioned. Convincing data are available from both the histologic and the physiologic points of view.

Histologically, it has been demonstrated that these vessels have about them and in their walls many nerve fibers and end-organs. Stöhr1 differentiated them into motor and sensory components, but Hassin2 did not feel justified in making this distinction. They agreed in stressing the significance of this nerve supply because of the importance of the pial vessels. Penfield3 found that not only the pial vessels, but also their intracerebral branches, are equipped with nerves.

Physiologically, the knowledge of the function of these nerves and end-organs has been more or less limited to the demonstration of motor effects, viz.,

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