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August 1932

THE THYROID FACTOR IN FAMILY PERIODIC PARALYSISREPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Gastro-Enterological and Neurological Clinics of the Department of Medicine, University of Maryland.

Arch NeurPsych. 1932;28(2):386-393. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1932.02240020138009
Abstract

Toward the end of the nineteenth century, much interest was manifested in the study of a pathologic syndrome termed family periodic paralysis. Admirable reviews of the "disease" were written by Singer and Goodbody1 and by Taylor.2 Other notable contributions were made by Goldflam,3 Oppenheim,4 Mitchell,5 Westphal6 and others. It was not, however, until the ingenious experiments of Shinosaki7 that any recent notable advances were made. In his summary paper of 1926, the relationship of family periodic paralysis to disturbances in the functions of the glands of internal secretion is stressed on the basis of numerous experiments. Heretofore, many other factors were considered in an attempt to elucidate the pathogenesis of periodic paralysis. Such theories, which considered malaria, scarlet fever, auto-intoxication, heredity, physical overexertion, indiscretions in diet, emotions and even internal secretory disturbances as important etiologic factors, were never adequately supported by substantial and

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