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September 1932

RESULTS OF STIMULATION OF THE TEGMENTUM WITH THE HORSLEY-CLARKE STEREOTAXIC APPARATUS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Institute of Neurology, Northwestern University Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1932;28(3):513-541. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1932.02240030033002
Abstract

A number of investigators have stimulated electrically the cut surface of the mesencephalon in decerebrate animals and have described in detail the reactions elicited. The literature related to such experiments has been reviewed by Hinsey, Ranson and Dixon.1 In general, stimulation of the pyramidal fibers in the basis pedunculi has been found to cause a rapid flexion of the fore and hind limbs of the side opposite to that stimulated, followed, on cessation of the stimulus, by prompt relaxation. However, when the stimulus is applied to the tegmentum there occurs a slow flexion of the ipsolateral fore limb and extension of the contralateral fore limb, these reactions persisting for some seconds after stimulation has ceased. Associated with these movements is a curvature of the spinal column which bends the trunk so that it offers a concavity toward the stimulated side. This curvature turns the head and tail toward the

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