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October 1932

THE BRAIN IN ACUTE RHEUMATIC FEVERNONSUPPURATIVE MENINGO-ENCEPHALITIS RHEUMATICA

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA; BUFFALO

From the Wards and Laboratories of the Philadelphia General Hospital, Temple University Medical School, and the Graduate School, University of Pennsylvania.

Arch NeurPsych. 1932;28(4):844-870. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1932.02240040089005
Abstract

Acute rheumatic fever is a general infection. Its major manifestations are fever, drenching sweats and polyarthritis. The heart may be and usually is involved. One attack does not confer immunity, but on the contrary makes a person more susceptible to recurrences. It must always be kept in mind that one or more of the symptoms may so overshadow the others that there is danger of overlooking the basic condition. It is not rare to find a patient with a typical rheumatic heart disease without a clue to a former rheumatic infection.

All the organs of the body may be involved in the general infection, and all may show inflammatory and degenerative reactions (Swift1 and Veil2). The organ that is notoriously involved is the heart (Fahr3), but the kidneys (Stettner4), lungs (Rabinowitz,5 Paul6 and Naish7) and other internal organs (Holsti8) and the vascular

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