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November 1932

POSTHEMIPLEGIC ATHETOSISREPORT OF A CASE: RÔLE OF CORTICOSPINAL PATHWAYS IN PRODUCTION OF CHOREIFORM AND ATHETOID MOVEMENTS

Author Affiliations

Commonwealth Fund Fellow in Psychiatry and Research Fellow in Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School

From the Boston Psychopathic Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1932;28(5):1091-1103. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1932.02240050127008
Abstract

The literature pertaining to the causes of choreiform and athetoid movements contains almost as many hypotheses as there are authors writing on the subject. The writings of Kahler and Pick,1 Monakow, Horsley,2 Bonhoeffer,3 C. and O. Vogt,4 A. Jakob, Foix and Hillemand,5 Wilson, Foerster, Minkowski, Spiller,6 Cobb,7 Niessl von Mayendorf8 and others illustrate the disharmony of the conceptions concerning the anatomic structures participating in the development of these involuntary movements. The nature of this paper will not permit a detailed review of the various opinions offered. Briefly, it may be said that there are those who relegate these movements to the corticospinal pathways (Wilson, Monakow, Spiller, Niessl von Mayendorf), and others (C. and O. Vogt, A. Jakob, Foerster, Minkowski, Bonhoeffer3) who attribute them to the perverted activity of systems of basal ganglia.

The following case is of interest because it manifests

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