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November 1932

INJURY AND REPAIR WITHIN THE SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEMII. THE POSTGANGLIONIC NEURONS

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Anatomical Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins University and the Department of Psychiatry of the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1932;28(5):1139-1148. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1932.02240050175011
Abstract

The postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers can regenerate. First, Tuckett,1 in 1896, and later, Machida,2 in 1929, demonstrated this clearly, with the fibers leaving the superior cervical ganglion for the eye. Observations on the return of vasomotor and sudomotor function after section and suture of a peripheral nerve, made in the experimental animal by Kilvington and Osborne,3 in 1907, and on man by Head,4 in 1920, and by Trotter and Davies,5 in 1909, indicate that the postganglionic fibers are, indeed, among the fastest growing of the fiber components of such a nerve. Recently, however, a new method has become available by which the state of sympathetic function in surfaces relatively free from hair can be studied. By the determination of the presence or absence of action currents in the skin, either spontaneous waves in the electrical potential of the skin or the reflexly elicited galvanic skin

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