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January 1933

FACTORS INFLUENCING EXPERIMENTALLY PRODUCED CONVULSIONS

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Section on Pediatrics, the Mayo Clinic.

Arch NeurPsych. 1933;29(1):148-154. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1933.02240070154009
Abstract

In two previous communications the methods of producing convulsions by thujone obtained from wormwood and of controlling them by the administration of acetone bodies, phenobarbital and by dehydration with sugar solutions have been described.1 Of the various acetone bodies, diacetone alcohol gave the greatest protection against the convulsant drug, the effect being more pronounced than even extreme dehydration. The thujone is emulsified in 6 per cent acacia, and the convulsant dose is from 0.35 to 0.4 cc. of 1 per cent emulsion for each kilogram of body weight. It is important to use rabbits that have not been used before, or those that have not been used for at least a week, and to prevent the animal from struggling, as this will decrease its susceptibility to convulsions due to thujone.

Wilder's original hypothesis attributed the effect of ketogenic diet on epileptic convulsions to the sedative effect of the aceto-acetic

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