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January 1933

THE BRAIN IN A CASE OF MOTOR APHASIA IN WHICH IMPROVEMENT OCCURRED WITH TRAINING

Arch NeurPsych. 1933;29(1):162-165. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1933.02240070168012
Abstract

The principal reason for reporting this case is the remarkable improvement that followed persistent training in spite of the fact that an autopsy, performed twenty-five years later, revealed complete absence of the hinder parts of the second and third frontal convolutions.

REPORT OF CASE 

Clinical History.  —Mrs. S. was born in England in 1865. There was nothing of significance in the family or early history of the patient. She was always well. She took some training as a nurse and supported herself and assisted her husband to complete a college course by doing practical nursing. The only fact of significance in the history prior to the stroke was that in 1902, after having worked very hard and having assumed much responsibility in the care of a patient, she had what was described as a "spell." During the attack, she "lost her speech" for two or three days and then recovered

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