[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
February 1933

ABSCESS AND THROMBOSIS OF THE SUPERIOR LONGITUDINAL SINUSClinicopathologic Report of a Case

Author Affiliations

Chicago Professor of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Illinois; Attending Neurologist Cook County Hospital

From the neuropathology laboratories of the College of Medicine, University of Illinois.

Arch NeurPsych. 1933;29(2):359-367. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1933.02240080149012
Abstract

The longitudinal (sagittal) sinus is the most conspicuous of the dural venous channels which gather the blood from the cerebral veins for final elimination through the internal jugular vein. Being only a part of the vast system of venous sinuses, its obstruction may not affect intracranial circulation as a whole but, depending on the fundamental cause, may indirectly involve the brain tissues. These phases, namely, the possible involvement of the cerebral parenchyma by an obstruction of a sagittal sinus and the histologic changes in the sinus itself, are the subject of the present paper.

REPORT OF CASE 

History and Course.  —A colored man, aged 51, entered the ear, nose and throat service of the Research Hospital of the University of Illinois on July 1, 1929, because of severe pain in the occiput and a mastoid infection, to which he succumbed on Nov. 11, 1930. During the sixteen months of illness,

×