[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
January 1934

CEREBELLUM AND RED NUCLEUSA PRELIMINARY REPORT ON A NEW METHOD OF PHYSIOLOGIC INVESTIGATION

Arch NeurPsych. 1934;31(1):110-126. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1934.02250010122006
Abstract

The greatest difficulty of the experimental neurologist is to present the results of his researches so convincingly that not only will they be accepted by those who are favorably disposed, but that it will not be possible for any one not to accept them.

This applies particularly to the investigation of function in the cerebellum and red nucleus. And the fact that so many methods have been tried by different observers without definite results only strengthens the stand of the unbelievers. Nevertheless all of these experiments have added something to the knowledge, though in no instance has this been conclusive. The experiments of Magnus1 and de Kleyn on thalamus and decerebrate animals can at best show only what activities remain after the forebrain and part of the midbrain have been removed. The extremely interesting results of Rademaker2 are for similar reasons open to question. In localized ablations the

×