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April 1934

EPILEPTIC CONVULSIONS AND THE PERSONALITY SETTING

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1934;31(4):755-767. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1934.02250040079005
Abstract

Much work has been done in recent years to clarify biochemical and neurologic factors in the vast and still confused field of "epileptic" disorders. The data observed, however valuable, have not yet been sufficient or adequately synthetized to explain convulsions. An important reason, no doubt, is the complexity of the factors involved and the fact that sufficient attempts have not been made to establish the interrelations with other biologic factors, and especially the setting in the whole psychobiologic unit—the personality. In studying an epileptic patient, one has to observe the type of integration which has been reached and the possible influence of part functions. This allows one to understand the influence not only of psychobiologic factors, but also of endocrinologic and other physiologic factors which are usually not analyzed but merely accepted (e.g., constipation and fatigue). Only in such a way will one be able to understand the factors which

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