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November 1934

SEVERE ACUTE MENINGO-ENCEPHALOPATHY OF LYMPHOGRANULOMATOUS ORIGIN OCCURRING IN THE COURSE OF HODGKIN'S DISEASE

Arch NeurPsych. 1934;32(5):1038-1044. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1934.02250110126009
Abstract

The history of the patient recorded here is of unusual interest, since it affords an example of the rare localization in the meninges and the brain of a pathologic process that begins ordinarily as a regional involvement of lymph glands, and though it often becomes more generalized, affecting group after group of lymph glands, as well as the spleen and other organs, seldom involves the neural structure. During recent years, however, more cases have been coming to light in which, in the course of the disease, epidural masses compress the spinal cord and cause paraplegia, and careful clinical studies and investigations at autopsy have revealed occasional involvement of the meninges and of the roots of the cerebral and spinal nerves. In 1933, a Moscow physician, Serebrjanik,1 described a case that he designated as meningo-encephalitis with polyradiculitis, in which he believed the neural lesions were due to this same pathologic

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