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March 1935

EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES IN ALCOHOLISMI. THE ALCOHOL CONTENT OF THE BLOOD AND CEREBROSPINAL FLUID FOLLOWING ORAL ADMINISTRATION IN CHRONIC ALCOHOLISM AND THE PSYCHOSES

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Boston Psychopathic Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1935;33(3):492-506. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1935.02250150042004
Abstract

Since Nicloux1 in 1900 first demonstrated that in dogs the blood and cerebrospinal fluid have approximately the same alcohol content, numerous studies have been made on the rise and fall of alcohol concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid following oral ingestion.

In 1930 Abramson and Linde2 investigated the blood and cerebrospinal fluid relative to their alcohol content after having administered alcohol orally to four patients. No data regarding the drinking habits of the patients were given. The authors concluded that the alcohol concentration of the cerebrospinal fluid rose more slowly than that of the blood and reached its maximum level later, a level which is lower than that of the blood; during the disappearance of the alcohol after the maximum levels have been reached, the alcohol content of the cerebrospinal fluid remains at a higher level than that of the blood.

In 1933 Mehrtens and Newman3 reviewed the

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