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April 1935

BODY TEMPERATURES OF PERSONS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA AND OF NORMAL SUBJECTSEFFECT OF CHANGES IN ENVIRONMENTAL TEMPERATURE

Author Affiliations

WORCESTER, MASS.

From the research service of the Worcester State Hospital and the Memorial Foundation for Neuro-Endocrine Research.

Arch NeurPsych. 1935;33(4):775-785. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1935.02250160090007
Abstract

Since it has been shown that schizophrenia is characterized by a variability greater than normal in certain physiologic processes and thus possibly that patients with this condition do not comply adequately with homeostatic principles,1 the general question of the effective adaptiveness of these patients to the external environment becomes pertinent. Normal man, as a homothermic animal, is able to preserve the constancy of his body temperature within a limited range regardless of a moderate amount of change in the external environment. The inability to maintain a constant body temperature, or poikilothermism, is definitely abnormal and indicative of a loss of some of the higher protective mechanisms of the body. The purpose of this investigation was to ascertain whether or not patients with schizophrenia could adapt themselves to changes in the external environment as regards body temperature, pulse and blood pressure as readily as could normal controls. This report deals

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