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April 1935

PAROSMIA IN TUMOROUS INVOLVEMENT OF OLFACTORY BULBS AND NERVES

Author Affiliations

Chicago

From the Department of Nervous and Mental Diseases, Northwestern University School of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1935;33(4):835-838. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1935.02250160150012
Abstract

Perversions of the sense of smell in organic intracranial disease are encountered not infrequently in lesions of the uncinate gyrus or adjacent parts of the temporal lobe. Uncinate gyrus fits, first described by Jackson and by Jackson and Beevor, produce momentary sensations of odor, usually of an unpleasant odor, accompanied or followed by a brief obscuration of consciousness. In the uncinate fit the cardinal symptoms are the momentary duration of the unpleasant odor and the obscuration of consciousness.

The case to be reported is that of a patient with intracranial disease who for two weeks had a continuous sense of an unpleasant odor; she could find no words to describe it and she could think of no smell with which to compare it. The odor did not come in momentary attacks or in paroxysms, but lasted continuously for two weeks. At no time was there an alteration of consciousness, such

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